Zimbabwe’s Mugabe makes defiant TV address

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VIDEO SHOWS: PRESIDENT MUGABE MAKING ADDRESS TO THE NATION
EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: VIDEO CONVERTED FROM 4:3
RESENDING WITH COMPLETE SHOTLIST AND SCRIPT
SHOWS: HARARE, ZIMBABWE (NOVEMBER 19, 2017) (ZBC – NO ACCESS ZIMBABWE)
1. GENERALS SITTING NEXT TO ZIMBABWE PRESIDENT ROBERT MUGABE AS HE MAKES HIS ADDRESS TO THE NATION
2. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ZIMBABWE PRESIDENT ROBERT MUGABE SAYING (PARTLY UNDER A CUTAWAY OF GENERALS):”Whatever the pros and cons of the way they went about registering those concerns, I as the President of Zimbabwe and as their commander-in-chief do acknowledge the issues they have drawn my attention to and do believe that these were raised in the spirit of honesty and out of deep and patriotic concern for the stability of our nation.”
3. MUGABE MAKING ADDRESS
4. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ZIMBABWE PRESIDENT ROBERT MUGABE SAYING:”Of greater concern (pauses while he finds the next page of the speech) to our commanders are the well-founded fears that the lack of unity and commonness of purpose in both party and government was translating into perceptions of inattentiveness to the economy. Open public spats between high ranking officials in the party and government exacerbated by multiple conflicting messages from both the party and government made the criticisms levelled against us inescapable.”
5. MUGABE MAKING ADDRESS
STORY: Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe on Sunday (November 19) defied his own ZANU-PF party and hundreds of thousands of protesters demanding his resignation by pledging in a television address to preside over the party’s next congress in December.Two sources – one a senior member of the government, the other familiar with talks with leaders of the military – had told Reuters Mugabe would use the address to announce his resignation after ZANU-PF earlier sacked him as its leader in a step precipitated by an army takeover four days earlier. But in the speech from his official residence, sitting alongside a row of generals, Mugabe acknowledged criticisms from ZANU-PF, the military and the public, but made no mention of his own position, instead pledging to preside over the ZANU-PF congress scheduled for next month. ZANU-PF had given the 93-year-old, who led his country to independence in 1980, less than 24 hours to quit as head of state or face impeachment, an attempt to secure a peaceful end to his tenure after a de facto military coup.The leader of Zimbabwe’s liberation war veterans said plans to impeach Mugabe would now go ahead.